Tabata Tuesday

Hi everybody,

We are so excited to announce that our website has some new and improved features. No ads, analytic abilities so we know exactly what you want, and we can now upload and share with you our latest Youtube videos.

In fact, here’s one of our earlier videos from Tabata Tuesday. You can view more like this if you subscribe to our Youtube Channel.

Sweater Weather

It’s that time of year again when the temperature drops and all we want to do is snuggle up in a warm sweater and drink a couple of Pumpkin Spiced Lattes. So why not order a PSL from your favourite coffee shop as well as one of our high-quality club sweaters, available at Kazoku Martial Arts Centre?

SwagOur sweaters feature the “K” logo, studio name, and an option to customize the other sleeve; either with your name, last name, or whatever you prefer!

Men’s, women’s and youth sizes are available; as well as unisex zippy style hoodies.

Contact us to order your’s today!

Also available are our club toques, snapbacks, baseball hats, t-shirts, and gym bags!

OKF Tournament

OKF logoSunday, September, 24, 2017 marked the day of many firsts. We participated in the Ontario Karate Federation Elite Level Tournament associated with the World Karate Federation.

Dean, our club’s elite competitor, bravely entered the ring to compete in the Kumite (sparring) division against other young athletic individuals. His division was the 14-15 year old Cadet Boys -57kg. In his first round, Dean’s tenacity brought him up six points against his competitor. Unfortunately within the final few seconds his opponent captured three points bringing him one point above Dean.

We were given a second chance later within the match to rank-up, but after receiving a kick to the inner-thigh the match had ended with our the other competitor advancing.

However with this being Dean’s first time competing at the elite level, his confidence has made us very proud here at Kazoku Martial Arts Centre. We now know what we are up against and will continue to improve our skill level to compete more in the future.


Dean 4I was really glad that there was so much support in the crowds today while I competed. I just wanted to let everyone know that I appreciate all of their help and support. And I appreciate the time they took out of their Sunday to cheer on myself and the Dojo. Also, thank you Sensei, for believing in me.” – Dean .M


And a special thanks from us at Kazoku Martial Arts Centre to Shihan Yabunaka and Victoria Rode for guiding us through the tournament, it’s processes, and getting us mentally prepared for Dean’s competition. We would also like to say thank-you to all of the individuals who helped organize the event. Conestoga College for hosting, the organizers at the Ontario Karate Federation, the referee’s, other competitors, and of course ALL of the volunteers who took the time out of their weekend to help run things extra smoothly.

And thank-you to Peter Pakatchian for ensuring we were in the right ring at the right time. His calm focus certainly made it feel that everything was under control.

Kazoku Martial Arts & Fitness Centre

Karate-Do: My Way of Life

Karate DoA recommended read for any karate practitioner

Click HERE to find it online


Linking the time when karate was a strictly Okinawan art of self-defense shrouded in the deepest secrecy and the present day, when it has become a martial art practiced throughout the world, is Gichin Funakoshi, the “Father of Karate-do.”

Out of modesty, he was reluctant to write this autobiography and did not do so until he was nearly ninety years of age. Trained in the Confucian classics, he was a schoolteacher early in life, but after decades of study under the foremost masters, he gave up his livelihood to devote the rest of his life to the propagation of the Way of Karate. Under his guidance, techniques and nomenclature were refined and modernized, the spiritual essence was brought to the fore, and karate evolved into a true martial art.

Various forms of empty-hand techniques have been practiced in Okinawa for centuries, but due to the lack of historical records, fancy often masquerades as fact. In telling of his own famous teachers-and not only of their mastery of technique but of the way they acted in critical situations-the author reveals what true karate is. The stories he tells about himself are no less instructive: his determination to continue the art, after having started it to improve his health; his perseverance in the face of difficulties, even of poverty; his strict observance of the way of life of the samurai; and the spirit of self-reliance that he carried into an old age kept healthy by his practice of Karate-do.